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Editor-in-chief
Maria Stella Graziani

Deputy Director
Martina Zaninotto

Associate Editors
Ferruccio Ceriotti
Davide Giavarina
Bruna Lo Sasso
Giampaolo Merlini
Martina Montagnana
Andrea Mosca
Paola Pezzati
Rossella Tomaiuolo
Matteo Vidali

EIC Assistant
Francesco Busardò

International Advisory Board Khosrow Adeli Canada
Sergio Bernardini Italy
Marcello Ciaccio Italy
Eleftherios Diamandis Canada
Philippe Gillery France
Kjell Grankvist Sweden
Hans Jacobs The Netherlands
Eric Kilpatrick UK
Magdalena Krintus Poland
Giuseppe Lippi Italy
Mario Plebani Italy
Sverre Sandberg Norway
Ana-Maria Simundic Croatia
Tommaso Trenti Italy
Cas Weykamp The Netherlands
Maria Willrich USA
Paul Yip Canada


Publisher
Biomedia srl
Via L. Temolo 4, 20126 Milano

Responsible Editor
Giuseppe Agosta

Editorial Secretary
Chiara Riva
Biomedia srl
Via L. Temolo 4, 20126 Milano
Tel. 0245498282
email: biochimica.clinica@sibioc.it

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ISSN print: 0393 – 0564
ISSN digital: 0392- 7091



BC: Articoli scritti da CM. Gambino

SARS-CoV-2: nuove prospettive della diagnostica di laboratorio
SARS-CoV-2: new perspectives for the clinical laboratory diagnostics
<p>The new Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the virus SARS-CoV-2, is characterized by a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations and different degrees of severity, ranging from asymptomatic/mild symptoms to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) and Multiple Organ Failure (MOF), potentially life-threatening. The clinical course of COVID-19 includes usually three stages. The first stage, defined as &ldquo;early infection&rdquo;, occurs at the time of virus infiltration in the lung parenchyma, via the interaction of SARS-CoV-2 with the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in ciliated bronchial epithelial cells. The second step, the &ldquo;pulmonary phase&rdquo;, is characterized by viral pneumonia with localized inflammation within the lung. The third stage, the &ldquo;hyperinflammation phase&rdquo;, is the most severe because of the development of a systemic inflammation and cytokine overproduction leading to ARDS and MOF.<br />In this complex contest, the laboratory can provide a strong support for the appropriate clinical management of COVID-19 for diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of the disease. Current research focuses on the potential role of immune and/or inflammatory biomarkers as useful tools in COVID-19 patients. In this narrative review, we will provide an overview about some of these biomarkers: procalcitonin, mid regional-pro adrenomedullin, presepsin, soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1/placental growth factor, ACE2, interleukin-6 and vitamin D.</p>
Biochimica Clinica ; 44(4) 023-024
COVID-19 - COVID-19
 
Catene leggere libere nella diagnostica liquorale della sclerosi multipla: possibile alternativa alla ricerca delle bande oligoclonali?
Free light chains in diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: an alternative to oligoclonal bands?
<p>Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common causes of neurological disability in young adults. MS presents heterogeneous clinical manifestations and both genetic and environmental factors are considered involved in the risk of developing the disease. The clinical diagnosis is rather complex reflecting the heterogeneity of the pathology. The diagnostic criteria, frequently modified over the years, require clinical symptoms, presence of typical lesions detected by magnetic resonance imaging and laboratory findings. The laboratory examination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) allows an evaluation of inflammatory processes confined to the central nervous system reflecting the changes in the immunological pattern due to the progression of the pathology, playing thus an important role in the diagnosis and monitoring of MS. The detection of the oligoclonal bands (OCBs) is recognized as a &ldquo;gold standard&rdquo; for laboratory diagnosis of MS, although it suffers from methodological limitations. Indeed, OCBs assay is a manual multistep procedure, time-consuming that requires a subjective interpretation. In the last years, the measurement of the free light chains (FLC) in CSF appeared to assist in the diagnosis of MS. This procedure has been presented as a simpler and cheaper tool than the qualitative detection of OCBs. This article examines the current knowledge about the laboratory diagnostic of CSF, investigating both the validated method (OCBs) and the alternative biomarkers of immunoglobulins intrathecal synthesis, as the quantification of FLC in CSF.</p>
Biochimica Clinica ; 44(2) 157-167
Opinioni - Opinions